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From the Editor

Visiting a former concentration camp is deeply emotionally challenging. Yet many Australian Jewish teenagers participate in organised trips to the camp sites, sometimes as a compulsory adjunct to school Israel trips. In this wide-ranging series, published for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Plus61J Media speaks to teachers, informal educators, organisers and health professionals about the benefits and pitfalls of sending young people to Holocaust memorial sites; the impacts of Holocaust education for both Jewish identity and countering antisemitism; and whether there are better alternatives.

Are Year 10 students too young to visit Auschwitz?

A visit to the camps can have a life-long legacy for young minds. ELANA BENJAMIN and PAULA TOWERS investigate the growth of this rite of passage among Australian Jewish youth and its impact on them.

What Holocaust educators must to do to combat modern antisemitism

Teachers need to focus more on the specifics of Jewish persecution and challenge students to question their assumptions about contemporary prejudice.

A teacher’s view of the hardest subject to teach well

Visiting the camps left some students both shocked and empowered but there was little space to talk about it, writes ITTAY FLESCHER, who taught at Melbourne Jewish schools for 15 years.

March of the Living Australia focuses on a new, non-Jewish cohort

ELANA BENJAMIN: The organisation which founded the Holocaust memorial visit program is branching out to take students from a private non-Jewish school to Poland and Israel.

‘The journey to Poland is laden with meaning, yet has scarcely been studied’

ELANA BENJAMIN finds there is very little published research that analyses the psychological impact of trips to Poland or Prague on Jewish teens.

Let’s go Morocco: Melbourne school has a different vision for its students

PAULA TOWERS: Instead of taking students to explore their European heritage, Bialik College will send a large group to Morocco to expose students to a different Jewish history.